Essential: Bay Leaves contain about 1.3% essential oils

Bay leaves are pungent and have a sharp, bitter taste, the fragrance of the bay leaves is more noticeable than its taste.

Bay leaves are aromatic leaves commonly used in cooking, it can be used whole or in a dried or ground form, when dried the aroma is herbal, slightly floral, and somewhat similar to oregano and thyme.

The leaves contain about 1.3% essential oils – consisting of 45% eucalyptol, 12% other terpenes, 8-12% terpinyl acetate, 3–4% sesquiterpenes, 3% methyleugenol, and other α- and β-pinenes, phellandrenelinaloolgeraniolterpineol, and also contain lauric acid.

Eucalyptol has been used in traditional medicine as a cough suppressant. It controls airway mucus hypersecretion and asthma via anti-inflammatory cytokine inhibition.

Terpenes, these compounds are known for their calming properties and they also can be supportive to the immune system in protecting us from harmful microbes, acting as antioxidants, and assisting in cellular repair.There is good evidence suggesting that terpenes have direct physiological effects on the body.

Sesquiterpenes are a class of terpenes, these compounds are known for their calming properties and they also can be supportive to the immune system in protecting us from harmful microbes, acting as antioxidants, and assisting in cellular repair.

A-Phellandrene is known to increase energy levels, reduce pain, and as an anti-cancer.

Linalool exhibits antifungal properties.

Geraniol has been suggested to represent a new class of chemoprevention agents for cancer.

A-terpineol attracts a great interest as it has a wide range of biological applications as an antioxidant, anticancer, anticonvulsant, antiulcer, antihypertensive, anti-nociceptive compound.

Lauric acid is used for treating viral infections including influenza (the flu); swine flu; avian flu; the common cold; fever blisters, cold sores, and genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV); genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV); and HIV/AIDS.


RECIPES: Food Pairing with Bay Leaves

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